Tombstone Tuesday: Lonely Cross

Click for larger image

Click for larger image

I run across these types of grave markers a lot in the southeastern Wisconsin area. Most of them are almost impossible to read after the wear and tear of the weather. This particular one is hard to read even without the spooky lighting that my camera captured. I’ve rarely seem markers like this that were readable, but I have seen them. They usually just list the persons name and year of birth and death. I’m assuming that these may be the “default” markers that are given to people that couldn’t afford a full headstone or were without family.

About Brian Zalewski

I started genealogy research about mid-1999. My grandfather had passed away in April of that year. Since then I’ve done a lot of research not only for myself, but for friends and other relatives. In 2006, I married the love of my life, Darcy, and welcomed the birth of our daughter, Aerissa Jean, in 2010 and our son, Xander Lee, in 2012. I can’t wait to tell them stories about all of their ancestors.

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Keepin’ The ZALEWSKI Line Going

The day finally came after a bit of waiting. After taking his sweet time and not being sure when he would decide to make his grand entrance, we welcomed Xander Lee Zalewski into the family. He was born at 3:15pm on December 8th weighing in at 7lb 4oz. His middle name, Lee, is taken from […]

Comments

  1. Diane Wright says:

    I have never seen a cross like that. It is pretty. I wonder if we have any in CA, I will be on the lookout, Thanks for sharing

  2. Brian says:

    They’re pretty common around here. Think maybe they’re made from iron, since a lot of the older ones are very rusty.brianjz

  3. Sue Hemmen says:

    This type of cross was often used by the German Russians who immigrated to this country. Milwaukee and Sheboygan, WI had a large population of Germans from Russia.